Epps-McGill Farmhouse pic

The Epps-McGill Farmhouse was one of nine properties applying to the National Register of Historic Places. In 1953, the McGill family leased the property, who are is considered to be the first African American family to do so. In 1976, Weaver McGill purchased the home.                               

Photo by Michaele Duke

The Epps-McGill Farmhouse was one of nine nominations under consideration for the National Register of Historic Places. The nomination was accepted by the State Historic Preservation Office and the South Carolina State Board of Review during a July 24, meeting. The application will be submitted to the National Parks Service in Washington DC for further review. Properties registered can qualify for tax credits to be used for restoration purposes.

The Board of Review is responsible for determining which properties within a state meet the National Register criteria for listing. Before any National Register nominations are submitted to the Keeper of the National Register in Washington, they must be approved by the board, whose membership includes professionals in the fields of architecture, architectural history, history, archaeology, and other related disciplines.

The Victorian style home built by Silas Wightman Epps, is located on Eastland Avenue in Kingstree and has served as a farmhouse for the Epps-McGill farm since its construction in 1905. In 1953, the McGill family leased the property who are considered to be the first African American family to do so. In 1976 Weaver McGill purchased the home.

Weaver McGill died in 1996 and his wife Margaret resided in the home until her death in 2006. According to the presenter, it is anticipated the home’s new purpose will serve as a bed and breakfast by the family. Information regarding the history of the home was obtained from the application.