Rosalind Gamble pic

Rosalind Gamble is currently working to collaborate with businesses and agencies to see her dream, an education and training program, “Sustainable living, from farm to house” where industrial Hemp will be utilized to construct a tiny Hemp house community, come true.

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Local woman’s goal is to build tiny hemp houses

There are many ways to build a healthy home and Rosalind Gamble is out to show us. Gamble, a Kingstree native, has a special permit to grow the plant but rather than produce CBD that is making news, she wants to build tiny Hemp houses.

Gamble is currently working to collaborate with businesses and agencies to see her dream, an education and training program, “Sustainable living, from farm to house” where Hemp will be utilized to construct a tiny Hemp house community, come true. “I want people to know they don’t have to go into mounds and mounds of debt to build a house.”

Industrial Hemp is a strain of the Cannabis sativa plant and does not produce the buzz one experiences when smoking its recreational cousin. Hemp has been used for thousands of years as a building material. It has a dense fibrous core that is suitable for rope and other fiber-based materials.

Gamble, who is the only local minority female to hold the permit, will use hemp to make hempcrete, a composite that is much like concrete, an excellent insulator and heat and mold resistant. The product also can be turned into paper and fabric and used for above grade walls, insulation and drywall. There are at least 50 hemp houses in the United States.

Gamble has four acres near Marion Church Road in the Salters area that she will start her crop, which can be harvested several times a year. She plans to incorporate greenhouses as she grows. She also would like to engage other counties in a competition of sorts. “Their houses won’t look like our houses,” she said referring to the different styles of Hemp homes already constructed across the country.

In the meantime, Gamble is looking for sponsors, partnerships and volunteers. Anyone interested in this groundbreaking venture can contact her at Rosealind@seedharvesttime.com or by phone at (843) 372-8085.